OUT OF FASHION

CONCRETE COWGIRL

PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A.

The myth of The Cowboy looms large over American culture. While you’d never know it from the movies, history was filled with daring characters that looked a lot more like Philadelphia’s “Concrete Cowgirl” Erin Brown than Roy Rogers. The century-old legacy of urban riding clubs provided inspiration for Erin’s impressive 30-plus year career as a competitive equestrian, riding instructor, and community organizer.

As an extension of the original Fletcher Street Stables, Brown founded the Philadelphia Urban Riding Academy (PURA). PURA, a 501(c)3 non-profit, has a powerful mission: To preserve and educate the public on the history and culture of Black urban cowboys in the City of Philadelphia through equine related activities and educational programs.

Erin is currently working on a fundraiser to build a permanent stable for PURA. To learn more, please visit the fundraiser here.

The Concrete Cowgirl has worked tirelessly to push the conversation in the national equestrian community to provide better access and representation for Black riders.
Erin wears style no. 3375
Erin wears style no. 3375
Erin wears style no. 3375
Nearly a quarter of early American cowboys were black. When industrialization caused a decline in demand for cowhands during the latter half of the 19th century, these Black cowboys spread across the nation in search of work. Many landed in cities like Los Angeles, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, sharing their expertise and setting up riding clubs and stables in their new communities.
Concrete Cowgirl, Philadelphia, U.S.A.
Nearly a quarter of early American cowboys were black. When industrialization caused a decline in demand for cowhands during the latter half of the 19th century, these Black cowboys spread across the nation in search of work. Many landed in cities like Los Angeles, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, sharing their expertise and setting up riding clubs and stables in their new communities.
Miz on a horse
Stephon Jr. on a horse
Historians estimate that one in four cowboys on the American frontier were black. Many landed in cities like Philadelphia.
Stephon Jr. and Erin on horses
From the manicured lawns of the USEF’s Kentucky headquarters to the rough-hewn cobblestones of her hometown, Brown’s career has been a testament to her adaptability and dedication. Equipped in Red Wing Heritage’s versatile Clara boot, the Concrete Cowgirl can stride from a board meeting to the stables with the confidence that her footing is both poised and practical.
Erin wears style no. 3404
Erin wears style no. 3404
Concrete Cowgirl, Philadelphia, U.S.A.
From left to right: Mil wears style no. 8859; Stephon Sr. wears style no. 1907; Miz wears style no. 875; Erin wears style no. 3405; and Stephon Jr. wears style no. 875.
Concrete Cowgirl, Philadelphia, U.S.A.
From left to right: Mil wears style no. 8859; Stephon Sr. wears style no. 1907; Miz wears style no. 875; Erin wears style no. 3404; and Stephon Jr. wears style no. 875.

Heritage - Style 3404
Women's Heeled Boot in Oro Legacy Leather
$339.99
Heritage - Style 3375
Women's Short Boot in Oro Legacy Leather
$309.99
Heritage - Style 1907
Men's 6-Inch Boot in Copper Rough & Tough Leather
$309.99
Heritage - Style 875
Men's 6-Inch Boot in Oro Legacy Leather
$299.99